The Healing – VI

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by DCH Park

There is something that comes up for me in the context of healing. It is something that I have heard before but didn’t fully appreciate before. It is similar to other things in that my practice of Huna has aided me considerably in my ability to understand this and apply it in my life.

The thing that I recognize is the idea, the truism, that wherever you go, there is only one of you there. No matter how many might be present in a given situation, there is only one person there.

This idea has many guises. Another of the more popular ones is that the “world is a reflection.” Whatever difficulty or turmoil you may find around you, it somehow reflects you and comes from you.

As we looked at in a previous essay, if you notice that your collar is mused up in your reflection, you are not served by trying to reach into the mirror, directly for your collar. You are better served to reach in the other direction, away from the mirror to reach your collar.

It may sound silly to try to reach into the mirror but in principle that is exactly what many of us try to do. This is not surprising or it shouldn’t be. We are very carefully taught over a period of many years to reach in the wrong direction. What’s amazing is that healing is close at hand, but not in the directions that most of us are reaching in.

Nevertheless, such healing is possible and available. It is easier than we ever imagined it could be.

Thus, it is possible to change the world around you by changing only yourself. Such change is only possible because the whole universe – all of existence – can be found within you.

It’s been said that a model of the universe is a bottle that contains itself. Such a model gains power by directly containing everything. This is the same power that you or I and/or everyone has. This is why you can experience change in your life by doing nothing more than healing yourself.

Huna provides philosophies and techniques for thinking about and handling these concepts. Leaving deeper realities aside for the moment, there is a simplified version of updated Ho’oponopono available for free on the internet.

The deeper practice of Ho’oponopono makes it clear that all things are connected and that healing yourself alone leads inevitably to changes in your life, but even with the free version of Ho’oponopono that is available online it is possible to clean yourself up and thus to experience change in your life.

© 2013, David Park. All Rights Reserved.

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What Is The Akashic Record?

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by DCH Park

I will no doubt upset many people with this question or with my answer. I am aware that there is a large base of people installed who make a living by the Akashic Record. They charge for classes, readings, etc. Similarly, there is a large number of people invested in accessing what they call the “Akashic Record,” who are convinced that they must find its wisdom outside of themselves. They believe that they have to go outside of themselves, into the universe, to find this wisdom.

Elaborate techniques exist to access these memories and bring them out or into life. However when I look at these techniques and what is brought back, more importantly, when I feel into what the “Akashic Record” itself is, my sense is very different from what I hear others saying. Specifically, I cannot access a record of what has been done and experienced in this universe other than life itself.

It is possible that there may be a technique or techniques of which I am unaware that would allow me and others to access these records and that they are distinct from life itself. It is possible that if I learned them, I might be able to access these records and I might say the same thing(s). However (1) I feel no draw toward these records; and (2) I find that the truth can be accessed intelligibly without them.

Occam’s Razor states that given a choice between two “explanations” of the universe, the simpler one is usually the better one. In spite of the fact that Occam proceeded from reason (or at least his Razor is presented that way), I find the principle is sound and useful. If nothing else, it is an invitation to notice what is absolutely necessary and to eliminate anything that is not. This awareness in itself is worth more than the price of admission.

Why would a universe that called forth someone like Occam have also created a separate record of events when one already existed? If it is possible to revisit any point in time, if time itself (as we “understand” it) is an illusion and we can actually visit time periods that are different than our own, why would the universe create and maintain a means to visit or view only time periods from the past with no ability to interact with or change what is experienced?

Such a creation would imply (by Occam) that we cannot travel back in time and that there is a fundamental difference between future and past. Otherwise, the record would be ultimately meaningless. Not only is the idea that past and future are fundamentally different questioned by modern physics, it seems to negate claims from shamanism, Huna, the Law of Attraction, and meditation. According to shamanism, for example, it is not only possible to travel to alternate (and past or future) time streams, it is possible to change them. In fact, this is a major healing technique available in shamanism.

It may be possible to imagine a situation in which a separate record exists and certain rules apply to the record that don’t apply to life, or what it reflects, but how much simpler and straightforward would it be to suppose that those who claim to be accessing the Akashic Record are actually accessing life and have a limited view of their access?

It seems easier, but it may not be. There may be a reason to support an Akashic Record that I don’t currently know of. I invite anyone who knows of such a reason to let me know it, but please be aware that while I assume that I may be wrong, I also assume that you may be wrong or that we may both be wrong. I also assume that we may create together.

© 2012, David Park. All Rights Reserved.

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Healing In Huna

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by DCH Park

There are several interrelated ideas in Huna that keep coming back over and over again. They have counterparts in other traditions, but they don’t tend to be articulated in the same way or with the same implications that you find in Huna.

One idea is that there are three components to the whole self. There is a tripartite self and in order to understand the self, one must understand it from the perspective that there are three selves. This idea is heard echoed in various psychologies, including various forms of western psychology, but typically with different emphases.

In Huna, it takes a slightly different form. The three members of the tripartite self are the High Self, the Middle Self, and the Low Self. The High Self is primarily associated with the spirit. The Middle Self is associated with the conscious, talking self, and the Low Self is associated with the body.

The High Self, being mostly focused on matters of the spirit, engages in a form of mentation that seems miraculous to the logical Middle Self. It appears to be more a kin to recognition than to the kind of ratiocination that the Middle Self is used to. Indeed, such logical process is (according to Huna) exactly the sort of mentation that the Middle Self excels at. The Low Self is associated primarily with the body and maintains the memory.

The word-image of a web is used within Huna to describe how the memory is organized by the body. This is the second image from traditional Huna that connects to healing. The abilities to fix the web and to decide how various components fit into the web in the final analysis make maintenance of the web critical for healing.

In a similar fashion, the Low Self is responsible for maintaining a web of connections between the self (or Low Self) and every other person, thing, and place that it has encountered. Thus, the Low Self is also charged with keeping the web alive in the world, just as it does internally.

A fourth idea comes from an extended version of Huna that was originally made available through Morrnah Simeona. One variation of Ho’oponopono is that repeating the lines, “I love you,” “I am sorry,” “Please forgive me,” and “Thank you,” over and over somehow puts you in touch with the creative forces of creation.

Combining these ideas makes it clear that in the interconnectedness of all things, the connection of the body (on one end) with all of creation, and of the spirit (on the other) with everything that is, makes the web of memories nothing other than a model for one way in which all that we know is created and maintained.

By extension, it is true not only that everything that exists does so within a web of our making, but also that the manner in which it exists (within our experience) is determined by who we are. We can change the world with nothing more than a change to ourselves. This is not only made possible through an understanding of Huna, but is made necessary by that understanding!

What do you choose the world to be? How do you shape the world? It is sufficient (and enough) to ask how would you be yourself?

© 2013, David Park. All Rights Reserved.

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Restitution and Responsibility – III

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by DCH Park

Many people have heard about Ho’oponopono and applied it with varying degrees of success. Most people have heard about it from Dr. Hew Len, a Hawaiian psychiatrist who has used it treating patients, including violent, criminally insane offenders. In my experience, those who have only had poor or inconsistent results from using Ho’oponopono have learned about it online or from friends and at best have only an incomplete understanding of the technique or its underlying philosophy or history.

The technique that most people know as Ho’oponopono is an updated and streamlined version which was taught to Dr. Hew Len by Morrnah Simeona. Madam Simeona was a respected kahuna who introduced an earlier version of Ho’oponopono to the Huna community in 1980. The older version is no less effective and has the added benefit of laying out a framework that can be comprehended and easily followed even if you have very limited understanding of Huna philosophy.

In the traditional form of Ho’oponopono, the wounded person or persons ideally have an open, loving dialog with the transgressor. This dialog has several distinct stages and is followed up with action. Without going into procedural details (which can be found elsewhere), descriptions of vital steps follow.

The first step in the dialog is an open affirmation by each member of the discussion of their intentions for the highest and best good and healing for everyone involved. The healing intention is for the transgressor as well as for the wounded.

The next step focuses on a group discussion of exactly what happened and how it affected those present. Each person speaks in turn while everyone else listens. Blame and emotionally charged accusations are not helpful in this context and are best left out of the discussion. The goal of this stage is for everyone to feel heard and be heard and for the group to come to a clear and mutual understanding of what was done and how it affected those present.

Once agreement is reached over the details of events, actions, and consequences, the third step can proceed. The third step focuses on restitution. It is not sufficient to acknowledge that someone has been hurt nor even to apologize for the commission. Beyond apology and blame, restitution requires that the transgressor take responsibility for his or her actions and that the wounded person(s) take responsibility for their wounds. Only then can the transgressor atone and thus release the burden of having injured another and heal. Only then can the wounded party release the injury and finally heal.

Given full realization and acceptance on both sides of personal responsibility, they can then proceed to determine the form of restitution that is appropriate. Both the transgressor and the principle wounded party must agree that the form of restitution is appropriate, fair, meaningful, and practicable. Beyond this, they are free to agree on any means or action for the precise form of the restitution.

Once the form of restitution is agreed upon, the group may celebrate their loving achievement and healing. The celebration might include a formal thanksgiving, a prayer, or open acknowledgement. It might also include feasting, music, dance, hugs, etc.

Traditional Ho’oponopono has been recognized by various psychologists, social workers, and experts in conflict resolution as being one of the very best formats for resolution and healing available. It bears a striking resemblance to Nonviolent Communication, which has a well-known track record in resolving conflicts even of international scope.

Ho’oponopono is remarkable in the way that each step builds on previous steps to create a loving momentum leading to mutual understanding and personal responsibility all within the context of stated desires for the healing of everyone. A vital part of this process is the restitution. Restitution is conspicuously absent from Hollywood depictions of justice. This is understandable since most Hollywood presentations are self-consciously dramatic ones and the momentum and power of Ho’oponopono is toward piercing the drama. When we transcend our drama, we are free to heal.

Ho’oponopono provides an excellent model for healing injuries to relationships, ourselves, and others precipitated by transgressions, both inadvertent and deliberate. However, conducting a dialog with someone who is not available still seems to present a challenge. In the third part of this series, we will touch on some ways to heal injuries that stem from interactions that may have occurred long ago with people who are no longer available.

© 2012, David Park. All Rights Reserved.

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Restitution and Responsibility – II

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by DCH Park

Many people have heard about Ho’oponopono and applied it with varying degrees of success. Most people have heard about it from Dr. Hew Len, a Hawaiian psychiatrist who has used it treating patients, including violent, criminally insane offenders. In my experience, those who have only had poor or inconsistent results from using Ho’oponopono have learned about it online or from friends and at best have only an incomplete understanding of the technique or its underlying philosophy or history.

The technique that most people know as Ho’oponopono is an updated and streamlined version which was taught to Dr. Hew Len by Morrnah Simeona. Madam Simeona was a respected kahuna who introduced an earlier version of Ho’oponopono to the Huna community in 1980. The older version is no less effective and has the added benefit of laying out a framework that can be comprehended and easily followed even if you have very limited understanding of Huna philosophy.

In the traditional form of Ho’oponopono, the wounded person or persons ideally have an open, loving dialog with the transgressor. This dialog has several distinct stages and is followed up with action. Without going into procedural details (which can be found elsewhere), descriptions of vital steps follow.

The first step in the dialog is an open affirmation by each member of the discussion of their intentions for the highest and best good and healing for everyone involved. The healing intention is for the transgressor as well as for the wounded.

The next step focuses on a group discussion of exactly what happened and how it affected those present. Each person speaks in turn while everyone else listens. Blame and emotionally charged accusations are not helpful in this context and are best left out of the discussion. The goal of this stage is for everyone to feel heard and be heard and for the group to come to a clear and mutual understanding of what was done and how it affected those present.

Once agreement is reached over the details of events, actions, and consequences, the third step can proceed. The third step focuses on restitution. It is not sufficient to acknowledge that someone has been hurt nor even to apologize for the commission. Beyond apology and blame, restitution requires that the transgressor take responsibility for his or her actions and that the wounded person(s) take responsibility for their wounds. Only then can the transgressor atone and thus release the burden of having injured another and heal. Only then can the wounded party release the injury and finally heal.

Given full realization and acceptance on both sides of personal responsibility, they can then proceed to determine the form of restitution that is appropriate. Both the transgressor and the principle wounded party must agree that the form of restitution is appropriate, fair, meaningful, and practicable. Beyond this, they are free to agree on any means or action for the precise form of the restitution.

Once the form of restitution is agreed upon, the group may celebrate their loving achievement and healing. The celebration might include a formal thanksgiving, a prayer, or open acknowledgement. It might also include feasting, music, dance, hugs, etc.

Traditional Ho’oponopono has been recognized by various psychologists, social workers, and experts in conflict resolution as being one of the very best formats for resolution and healing available. It bears a striking resemblance to Nonviolent Communication, which has a well-known track record in resolving conflicts even of international scope.

Ho’oponopono is remarkable in the way that each step builds on previous steps to create a loving momentum leading to mutual understanding and personal responsibility all within the context of stated desires for the healing of everyone. A vital part of this process is the restitution. Restitution is conspicuously absent from Hollywood depictions of justice. This is understandable since most Hollywood presentations are self-consciously dramatic ones and the momentum and power of Ho’oponopono is toward piercing the drama. When we transcend our drama, we are free to heal.

Ho’oponopono provides an excellent model for healing injuries to relationships, ourselves, and others precipitated by transgressions, both inadvertent and deliberate. However, conducting a dialog with someone who is not available still seems to present a challenge. In the third part of this series, we will touch on some ways to heal injuries that stem from interactions that may have occurred long ago with people who are no longer available.

© 2012, David Park. All Rights Reserved.

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Drain the Mana

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by DCH Park

Have you ever noticed how very helpful it can be when someone listens as you vent? It can be particularly helpful when the other person forgoes offering explanations, trying to tell you about his or her experience that might have been similar, or even agreeing with you that you were poorly treated. Simple listening with no agenda, expectation, or attachment to the ultimate outcome has the most amazing power to heal.

It’s as if the listener, by being open and receiving what you have to vent without trying to figure it out, explain it, or judge it as good or bad, helps you to drain the emotion of power and let it fall away. This sounds miraculous until you consider the observation that my wife shared with me once – that being fully present with someone is an act of love.

This same presence is available to anyone. You can bring it to yourself. This is one way to understand the nature and power of the witness consciousness. In witnessing yourself in ego, especially ego drama, you can drain the ego play of its power. It becomes an empty balloon that is easily dismissed. Even the empty balloon fades with time into nothing at all.

The Huna perspective on this is helpful. In Huna, the energy that animates life is called mana. All living things need mana. Even something that isn’t alive can become powerful and “take on a life of its own” with sufficient mana. Thus, by draining the mana from something, you can deflate it and eliminate its influence over you.

Mana is like water. By puncturing an ego drama, you can effectively drain its mana. This can be done with witness consciousness. The simple act of noticing that you are caught up in feeling or thinking something punctures the emotion or thought and begins draining it of mana.

With complex or layered emotions or thoughts, this may become a bit more involved. A single puncture won’t drain the entire thing, just as it takes more than a single puncture to drain an orange. All of the internal structure – the membranes, sections, and vesicles or pulp – form sacks that contain the juice. In order to fully drain the juice, the little sacks must each be punctured.

As you witness yourself explore the emotion or thought, you open the myriad corners that you experience and allow them to drain in a manner that is analogous to opening the sections and pulp pieces in an orange to drain its juice.

It is also helpful to remember that once opened, the orange drains it its own time. You can squeeze it to force it to drain faster but that usually leaves pulp pieces intact and floating in the juice and at any rate doesn’t completely drain the orange. Beyond this, you probably wouldn’t want to squeeze yourself or your ego, assuming you could figure out how.

Once opened, the ego will drain in its own time. Exploring the layers and corners of the emotion or thought without judgment or expectations can help in the process, but remember to be open to whatever the ego play may hold and to have no expectations or attachments to possible outcomes. Allow the ego to drain as you witness it unfold. In doing so you are loving yourself and healing yourself deeply.

© 2012, David Park. All Rights Reserved.

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Positive (or Negative) Expectations

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by DCH Park

It is popular in some circles to embrace juicy displays of excitement and joy as part of the creation process. Perhaps partly due to a widespread misunderstanding or too literal interpretation of lessons in The Secret and other texts, the notion that joy, gratitude, and excitement about your creation should be strong and palpable is very popular.

If this is your natural mode and it works for you, then by all means, continue. Some people are very joyful and excited. They veritably vibrate with excitement and appreciation. Their energy seems almost tangible. They are able to pass that excitement on to others, which can be a powerful motivator for action.

The emotional impact of such individuals is almost physical in its effect. In fact, the Huna view of such raw emotion is that it is felt through the Basic Self, which is associated most closely with the body and subconscious. Huna also suggests that since the Basic Self is equally capable of feeling negative emotions, these same people are as prone to strongly feel and radiate their negative emotions as they are their positive ones.

However, there is a full range of emotions and wide variety in the ways that people experience and express them. Notice that there is another way to feel the reality of a new creation even before it is ready to be experienced in the physical world. Notice the sense of certainty you have in taking a step in the dark. You can’t see the floor before you, but you step out with a sense of surety that it is there. Beyond that, you have a sense for what it feels like and where it is. On those occasions when the floor wasn’t where you expected it to be, the moment your foot passed through the space where you expected to find the floor, your sense of surety instantly passed into alarm.

By the same token, if the floor was where you’d expected but felt different than you’d expected (for example if it was carpeted instead of hardwood or if it was wet), you probably felt surprise. Not alarm to be sure, but the swiftness and dynamics of change in your emotional state was probably nearly identical.

This sense of certainty is a subtler thing than the keen, body-felt excitement of the Basic Self. It is also very powerful, arguably more powerful than the excitement. Napoleon Hill identifies this sense of certainty as the single most powerful emotion in creating new experiences. Hill calls it Faith.

The story is told of a man familiar with the Law of Attraction who had befriended a powerful Native American shaman in the southwest. They were experiencing a drought, having already gone many weeks without rain. The shaman announced that he would perform a rain ceremony to bring rain.

The man asked his friend if he could come to witness the ceremony. The shaman agreed. The man was very excited. He was eager to see how the shaman, who was well known for his ability to bring rain, would pray for rain. Would there be long meditations, chanting and drumming, exotic rituals?

They walked up onto a high plateau. After a long time the shaman announced that they had arrived at the proper spot. He drew a circle in the dry dirt and took off his shoes. Then he stepped into the circle and stepped out again. He put on his shoes and motioned for his friend to follow him back down the slope. The ceremony was over!

The man was startled. Had he missed something? Was his friend pulling his leg? Maybe they would do the real ceremony after they’d both had a good laugh.

He asked the shaman what had happened. The shaman answered that he had pictured in his mind the rain falling and felt the mud between his toes when he stepped into the circle. He believed that the mud was there instead of the dust. That was the creation.

The next day, it rained.

This quite certitude is characteristic of the High Self in Huna. In contrast to the broad flush of excitement and joy that are like blunt instruments powerfully wielded by the Basic Self, quiet certainty and faith are like a fine instrument – a surgeon’s scalpel. When handled with deftness and precision, it can do much more in less time and with less effort than the blunt instrument can. It doesn’t take a gigantic effort to bring down a giant. It only takes a small stone applied to the right spot in the right way.

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Forming Powerful Resolves

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by DCH Park

Consider the manner in which powerful resolves are made. Also called manifestations or creations, resolves are statements about what you desire and choose to call into your experience.

Whether you embrace Abraham and the Law of Attraction, Napoleon Hill, Wallace Wattles, and the principles of success, Huna, or any other philosophy of success is immaterial. The ability to compose powerful statements about what it is that you intend to create in your life is useful, even if it’s only to firmly set your goal in your mind so that you don’t waver as you proceed.

Of course, many schools of thought and philosophies of success recognize the importance of taking action to reach your goals. The ability and readiness to recognize and act on opportunities when they arise is a vital part of creating success. You can never know ahead of time from which quarter a new opportunity may arrive and often situations that present themselves at first as burdens, disappointments, or distractions lead to or morph into huge opportunities later on.

Action in the world is no doubt a key component in successfully realizing your creation(s) in the physical world, however, the creation of whatever it is that you may prefer begins with your resolve. Napoleon Hill was neither the first nor the last person to note that “thoughts are things.” All success and all failure have their beginnings in the thoughts that we cultivate long before either success or failure are realized.

There are several principles or guidelines that may prove useful to keep in mind as you form your resolve. In no particular order, these are:

  • Be clear and definite.
  • Be simple and direct. Use as few words as possible.
  • Define your desire in positive terms.
  • Be aware of the feeling tone that accompanies your recitation of your resolve.
  • Believe it. If you don’t or can’t believe it, it won’t happen.
  • Begin with baby steps – “Crawl, Walk, Run.”
  • Use images. Images that evoke strong felt experience are best.
  • Powerful words that evoke images are good. Excessive verbiage disconnected from images is poor. Language can actually impede the creation process.
  • Express your resolve in the present tense.
  • Include yourself in the picture.
  • Relax. It doesn’t have to be perfect. It is yours. You can refine it, restate it, or change it altogether at anytime as you learn and grow.

Clarity and definiteness sound obvious, but in practice, achieving them can be challenging. Generally, it is better to be as specific as possible about the desire while at the same time releasing all notions about the manner in which your desired creation will appear in your life in the physical world.

The classic interpretation of this principle emphasizes specificity about worldly details, so instead of saying, “I have lots of money,” the principle is taken to be a recommendation to be specific about the amount, “I have $10M in the bank.” Extraneous details about the desire, especially about how it might be achieved, are revealed in this way as being counterproductive.

However, as worded, the desire that “I have $10M in the bank,” in its focus on the physical details, entirely misses the context which gives that $10M significance. For example, $10M in the bank sounds good unless you owe $20M. Alternatively, consider that 50 years ago $10M would have seemed like an impossible sum and 50 years from now, $10M, though still a lot, may seem more like what $500K seems now or what $100K seemed like in the past.

One common response to this shortcoming is to add more words to describe the context, but this rapidly deteriorates into long, wordy statements that would be more appropriate in a legal contract than in powerful manifestations. This practice is reminiscent of trying to reason back to the object that casts shadows on a wall from nothing but shadows. To even have a chance of being accurate about the object, you have to take into account any imperfections and irregularities in the wall as well as in the light. Is the light bright, steady, dim, or flickering?

Even after adjusting for all of that, you still have no way to knowing from just the shadow if the object is a dog or someone casting a shadow that looks like a dog or even if there are several objects that line up to cast a composite shadow. You may not have any idea at all of what the nature of the object is.

In a similar vein, perhaps the statement “I have $10M in the bank” is definite but not clear. The focus on the $10M might be like focusing on the shadow. Is $10M really what you want to enjoy or is the $10M simply a familiar cultural proxy for something deeper, truer, and more personal? Incidental details shift as the context changes, just as the shadows on a cave wall shift as the fire dances, but the inner truth is constant, just as the object casting the shifting shadow remains unchanged.

The unchanging truth that you might be reaching for through the proxy of $10M might be a sense of wealth and ease firmly rooted in the felt knowing and embodied experience that when you need or want something, it is there for you. That, in other words, the experience of privation and self-denial that characterizes a lack of resources is as abstract for you as the temperature on the far side of the moon might have been to the Ancient Mariner.

Embracing clarity and definiteness about this deeper reality – the personal, felt experience of wealth and ease – not only makes your resolve much more powerful and immediate, it opens up possibilities through which you can enjoy its realization that you would probably have otherwise remained closed to. Letting go of your focus on $10M allows you to explore and appreciate the true abundance and variety of your wealth and the richness of the universe.

It is best to state your resolve so that your desire is directly identified. Stating your desire in terms of its opposite actually defines the opposite more than the desire. One person, tired of always fighting with his spouse, focused on “not fighting all the time” rather than something like “I love and appreciate my wife.” They ended up divorcing each other. Although divorcing his wife did ironically provide a means to realize his resolve of “not fighting all the time,” it was precipitated by continued and escalating conflict with his wife. By focusing on “not fighting,” he actually manifested more fighting.

To understand this, most success and attraction gurus content themselves with hazy statements like, “the universe doesn’t understand (or respond to or accept)‘not’ and ‘no.’” Although these statements are accurate observations, they have very little or no power to illuminate. They merely articulate another rule to remember and follow from the mysterious rulebook of life.

I have personally always had a hard time accepting that. In my experience, when rules are put forth with little, weak, nonsensical, or absent explanation, it indicates that someone is hiding something (like an agenda or ignorance) or that I am missing or misunderstanding something. Happily, Huna provides a philosophy of success that illuminates the situation.

As mentioned above, images are very powerful. Huna makes clear that images are the means by which messages are sent and received outside of and beyond what people commonly experience as physical reality. Thus, the resolves that you formulate are communicated to your High Self and the universe beyond in the form of images. Notice that it is impossible to negate an image. If you picture something, say an apple, and then try to negate the apple, you end up with the apple or something else instead. There is no negative apple.

Negation is a function of language (the trope of a circle with a slash is culturally defined and thus a linguistic artifact). Since spirit communicates with images, there is no negation in communicating with spirit and resolves defined in terms that negate something actually convey a desire for the thing being negated.

As with anything, you must crawl before you walk and you must walk before you run. It may be too much of a stretch to go directly to your ultimate goal. In that case, it can help to start small and build up a track record of relatively smaller successes. For example, if you are very ill or badly injured, it may seem like nothing more than wishful thinking to resolve to be fully healthy with full use of arms and legs.

However, smaller goals, such as not feeling so achy, being able to eat and hold down a meal, or just sitting up in bed may be good places to start. As successes mount, your expectations will naturally shift so that bigger and bigger things become possible. Soon, things that once seemed impossible become natural.

This is an interesting subtlety. The emotional tone with which you state and hold your resolve is critical. If you are negative and pessimistic when you embrace your resolve, the net effect is to delay realization of the goal or in fact to create the experience of lack, which naturally engenders greater pessimism. You can ride the spiral down as easily as you can ride it upward. Some people take this to mean that feelings of joy and exuberance are important in making resolves. However, others note that the feeling of certainty or faith is the most important and powerful feeling tone.

When you go to a distant place full of beauty and wonder, especially if you have been anticipating being there for some time – for example the Grand Canyon or Disneyland – there is a sense of reality to the place that only serves to underscore the impact of being there. It is akin to the knowing that water is wet and fire is hot.

This is the faith or knowing that can transform a resolve into reality. Emotionally, it is already real. From this point of view, it makes no more (or less) sense to be exuberant or bubbly over your resolve than it does over the fact that fire is hot or that Disneyland is. Holding a resolve in such faith has amazing power. It can instantly transform your perspective. Actions can suddenly seem possible, even matter-of-fact. Success can become as inevitable as the morning sun.

As Annie sings, “tomorrow is a day away.” It tends to be self-defeating to resolve that you will have, be, or do something “some day.” It can be equally frustrating to resolve that you “want to” be, do, or have something. Resolving to want something is immediately self-fulfilling. You already want it. Ta-da! You’re successful. You created what you desire.

Instead, state your resolve in the present tense. Rather than “I will create a fortune,” state “I have a fortune.” What is even better, focus on the experience of having the fortune. What does it feel like? This also has the virtue of putting yourself in the picture. It does little good to picture piles of money if you aren’t there to enjoy it. Similarly to creating in the present, picturing piles of money, a new house, new car, or new spouse without including yourself in the picture is easily realized. These things all exist in the world. Focus instead on your experience of yourself enjoying these things.

In conclusion, remember that words are generally not the best vehicle for making or stating your resolve. They can be helpful as tools to explore how you want to define your resolve and for accessing it quickly. However words are a poor vehicle for capturing and conveying your resolve. Images and body sensations are far more powerful. Beyond the emotional and physical solidity of faith and belief, body sensations can help make the resolve more vivid and immediate.

For example, if you desire a vacation in Hawaii, an image of a white sandy beach may be potent but compare that to imagining yourself on that beach. Feel the weight of your body as you sink into the sand, the warmth of the sun and sand on your face and back. Smell and hear the ocean.

If you are having challenges in forming your resolve, begin with what you have and be aware of what does and does not work well or feel right. Use it. State it. This is often quite helpful in uncovering lacunae that you don’t see because a conceptual blind spot hides it. If this happens, you can always refine or change your resolve. It is yours.

For example, one person felt that she had a good idea of what she wanted because she had always had a sense of what success would be like or look like and she felt successful, at least on paper. However, when she did an exercise that called for her to state her resolve clearly, she discovered that she did not have a succinct, powerful statement. She had only vague and poorly defined notions of what she wanted.

Yoga Nidra is an excellent practice for this sort of realization. The name translates as “the sleep of the yogis” and it is a means for putting the body to sleep while remaining awake in order to gain conscious access to the creative imaginal mind. More information about Yoga Nidra and other practices will be available in these pages shortly.

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“Forming Powerful Resolves” by DCH Park is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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Energy Rights

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by DCH Park

These days it seems that we hear about energy more and more. This is true not only in terms of fuel and global warming but also in terms of healing and transformation. In many ways, these apparently disparate connotations of the word are interrelated. Our relationship to energy and how we understand it as a culture is changing on both ends of the spectrum. For example, Oprah had a guest performing Reiki on her show before it ended. This particular guest was a medical doctor who used Reiki as one way to help his patients. It was one of a host of techniques and treatments at his disposal, like prescribing pain killers or surgical interventions. In his on-air demonstration, the person receiving Reiki reported feeling relief from her problem almost immediately. This is not unusual.

In addition to Reiki, there are many other healing modalities that utilize energy rather than some sort of chemical or physical intervention. Among them are various forms of Pranic Healing, some shamanic healing, Ho’ Oponopono and other Huna techniques, various Taoist practices including some forms of Qi Gong and some Chi techniques, and faith healing. One could even count hypnotherapy, dream work, counseling, and psychological talk therapy among these since spontaneous changes and remissions of physical ailments are not unknown as a result of resolving difficult emotional trauma.

One friend of mine recently raised the question, “What is this energy and where does it come from?” I recall that in high school physics, we made a big deal about defining terms. Our physics textbook defined energy as “the ability to do work.” I find this somewhat helpful in this context. It conjures up images of a world of material objects and bodies, unable to move or follow any of the patterns of life or change because it is bereft of energy. Even decay is impossible.

So energy is an ineffable quality that enlivens matter. It makes change, life, and growth possible. For the sick and injured (or merely sick and tired) it makes healing and improvement possible. However, as neat as this view seems to be, it fails to answer the question – “What is energy?”

Perhaps this division of the world into matter and energy, as apparently appealing as it may seem to be, is false. As Einstein stated in his formulation of Special Relativity, the division of the world into matter and energy is an illusion. All matter is composed of energy and matter and energy change form into one another continuously. He even quantified the amount of energy contained in matter.

So if the separation between matter and energy is an illusion and everyone and everything is in a very real sense an energy wave of greater or lesser density (or equivalently higher or lower vibration) in a universal sea of energy waves, where does all this energy come from and how do we know that we have a right to use any of it, especially to effect change, like healing someone? You may ask yourself, “What right do I have to this energy? Who am I? Why am I so special?”

Who are you not to use it? Do you worry about enjoying the warmth of the sun on your face or the feel of the cooling rain or the air you breathe? What right do you have to that lungful of air you just sucked in? The same right you have to the space that your body takes up and the energy all around and within you. The right you have to your energy is exactly the same as the right you have to your life, spirit, and body.

In fact, in modern shamanism, it is recognized as a fundamental truth that you always have absolute right over your own energy. No one and nothing can usurp that from you. Frightened, injured, sick, or misguided entities and people may try to slip in and take your energy without being noticed, but once you have recognized them and told them to leave, they must leave. This is a major distinction between modern views and many traditional practices.

Of course, there is a significant difference between telling or demanding that an entity leave and asking it to leave. The tone and energy are different. In the latter case, you are not exercising your right. You are requesting another to recognize your right without claiming it yourself. In order to own your energy (or anything else that is yours) you must claim it. Once you do claim it, your right is made clear and explicit to all, most importantly, to yourself.

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“Energy Rights” by DCH Park is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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